9pm curfew and 4.5million in lockdown – what could happen next

If current legislation fails, severe new measures could be taken to halt the rise of the coronavirus, reports say.

On Monday, the government introduced the rule of six – meaning no more than six people can meet in private or in public.

At the end of this week, hospitality and leisure businesses will be forced to include contact details of all their customers – something that was voluntary until now.

And it is feared that Italy and Greece may be added to the growing list of places people in the UK cannot travel to this week.

The measures come because only 17 places in England are showing a declining coronavirus and nearly 50 are on the watch list, which means they are of concern.

And the Welsh Health Minister has said the country could be locked again in weeks.

But the government is looking at tough measures that just can’t be shut down in an attempt to stop the spread.

According to the Sunday Telegraph, up to 4.5 million people at risk of serious illness will be asked by Covid-19 to stay home or receive tailored advice to protect themselves if cases rise to dangerous levels.

The newspaper said people identified using a new ‘risk model’ based on factors such as underlying health status, age, gender and weight will receive letters with specific advice.

The plan is initially intended to operate in areas with severe contamination levels, but officials are willing to roll it out nationwide if necessary, a source told the paper.

And, according to the paper, Prime Minister Boris Johnson is believed to be considering introducing a 10 PM or 11 PM curfew in restaurants, bars and pubs if local measures fail to control the spread of the virus.

The move stems from concerns that adherence to social distance measures decreases as people consume more alcohol.

The Sun says curfew could be as early as 9 p.m.

A curfew is currently being tried as a control measure in Bolton.

Peter Openshaw, Professor of Experimental Medicine, Imperial College London, said a “trickle” of cases could turn into a “cascade,” adding that if people don’t abide by the “rule of six” now, the country will face it again. “hard lock”.

Prof Openshaw, who is a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) that advises the government on the threat of new and emerging respiratory viruses, said on Sky’s Ridge on Sunday, “ We know these very vulnerable pockets. It’s not just in the younger people, it’s starting to show up in people who are more vulnerable and will inevitably be followed by hospitalizations and deaths, so we have to act quickly. “

He added, “I think everyone would agree that we need to act really fast now to keep this from growing exponentially.

“I think the main point is that we need to act quickly because it’s so much harder to get this kind of thing under control if you put it off.

“Even a few days can be potentially quite dangerous right now.”

Former Chief Scientific Adviser and member of the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (Sage) Sir Mark Walport has warned that the country is “on the verge of losing control of Covid-19”.

Asked if he thinks Sir Mark is right, Professor Openshaw said to Ridge, “Yes, I think that’s correct.”

The Sunday Times reported a Health Department report flagged as “ officially sensitive ” that it was circulating on Friday that the coronavirus recorded through satellite tests – used in nursing homes – had quadrupled since the beginning of the month. .

The paper also said health secretary Matt Hancock received an emergency update on Wednesday saying outbreaks had been detected in 43 care homes.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Social Care said, “During our coronavirus response, we have done everything we can to ensure that all staff and residents of care homes are protected.”

Harsh new Covid-19 lockdown measures were announced Friday for parts of the UK as cases continued to rise and the R number – the reproduction number of coronavirus transmission – climbed above one.

According to government advisers, the last time R was above one was in early March.

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