Dancer, 22, hurled herself from eight-floor balcony to escape abusive boyfriend

A young dancer hurled herself off an eighth-storey balcony in a desperate attempt to escape her abusive boyfriend.

Georgia Brodrick, 22, called her dad in hysterics on the morning of July 17 from her Melbourne apartment, begging him to come and pick her up.

She had just learned her boyfriend had cheated on her. Her dad didn’t make it in time and Ms Brodrick jumped off the balcony and landed on a fence, her body bouncing into a nearby ditch.

She was rushed to hospital and put into an induced coma for emergency surgery on her left arm, which had gruesomely been partially amputated in the fall, Daily Mail Australia reports.



Her injuries were so bad that doctors gave her just a 10% chance of survival, suffering a broken back, neck and leg.

Miraculously she pulled through with no brain damage, although she has no memory of the traumatic moments before she jumped.

Ms Brodrick spent three weeks on the trauma ward being fed through a tube and is now using a wheelchair.

She’s now bravely opened up about the emotional abuse she suffered at the hands of her controlling boyfriend.



“If I tried to leave him he would sit at the front door and wouldn’t let me out of the apartment,” she told Daily Mail Australia.

“My family tried to warn me because they could see through his manipulation, so he constantly put them down and blamed them for my insecurities.

“He made me feel like he was the only person who truly loved me.”

Thankfully she’s now safe with her family and getting the help she needs to move on.



She hopes to be able to walk again by Christmas, but doesn’t know if she’ll ever regain full use of her left arm.

Friends organised a GoFundMe for Ms Brodrick after her accident, which reads: “She has had a lot of surgeries but she will still have a massive recovery ahead.

“There is going to be a lot of cost to get our girl back on her feet as she may never be able to walk properly again.

“The money will be going to get her Dialectical behaviour therapy as well as rehab and other treatments along the way.”



Ms Brodrick urges anyone in an abusive relationship to seek help as soon as possible.

“Please speak to a family member or a close friend that you trust, ask them for help and organise a plan to get out of the dangerous situation.”

For emotional support, you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org, visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

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