Pablo Escobar's horny hippos castrated by vets after running rampant in Columbia

Notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar’s “oversexed” pet hippo is neutered by vets after ranting across the country.

Veterinarians perform the very first castration of the horny hippos and former pets to avoid taking over Columbia.

Reportedly, the hippos have been the kingpin’s favorite pets and have escaped many times since Escobar was shot in 1993.

To prevent them from terrorizing and reproducing villagers, local vets are now spaying them.

The overly fertile descendant of the drug lord will be the first ever neutered hippo to live in the wild in 12-hour surgery.



The long procedure can be dangerous and requires a crane to move the huge animals.

According to WebConserva vet, Carlos Valderrama, the task is difficult, especially due to the aggressive nature of the mammals.

To talk with DW.comCarlos said: “When we transported the hippo we were spaying, it moved a little while under anesthesia.

“And the rear wheels of the truck went up.”



The mammals must be anesthetized to continue the procedure and to avoid casualties.

In 1993, the New York Post reported that one male and three female hippos escaped from Escobar’s jungle hacienda – the other animals, zebras, elephants, and camels from the drug lord all found homes in zoos around the world.

However, the bellicose hippos spent the past few years only reproducing and disturbing villagers.

There are an estimated 80-150 wild hippos in the country and they are growing fast.

The government has even ordered the shooting of a so-called violent hippo “Pepe” in 2009, but animal rights protests have halted the movement.



The New York Post Carlos reports: “A jaguar is our biggest predator. It’s huge, it’s beautiful, but it weighs 100 pounds. It can’t do anything against an adult hippo.”

Without predators and hippos that reach sexual maturity, the local government agency believes they can multiply quickly.

“Within a few decades,” ecologist Jonathan Shurin of San Diego, California National Geographic said earlier this year “there could be thousands.”

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